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Arian Foster Says He Took Money at Tennessee

Sports ArianFoster 300x219 Arian Foster Says He Took Money at Tennessee

Arian Foster

Houston Texans running back Arian Foster says in an upcoming documentary he accepted money his senior year at Tennessee.

“Honestly, I don’t know if this will throw us into an NCAA investigation, but my senior year I was getting money on the side,” Foster says in the EPIX documentary. “I really didn’t have any money. I had to either pay the rent or buy some food. I remember the feeling, like, `Man, be careful,’ but there’s nothing wrong with it. You’re not going to convince me that there is something wrong with it.”

Sports Illustrated first reported Foster’s comments in the documentary, “Schooled: The Price of College Sports.”

Foster, who played for the Volunteers from 2005-08, expanded on his comments after the Texans’ practice.

“I feel very strong about the injustice the NCAA has been doing for years,” Foster said. That’s why I said what I said. I’m not trying to throw anyone under the bus or anything like that. … I feel like I shouldn’t have to run from the NCAA anymore. They’re like these big bullies. I’m not scared of them.”

Andrew Muscato, a producer of the documentary, said Foster didn’t specify how much money he received or who paid him during the four-hour interview in February.

Tennessee athletic director Dave Hart said in a statement released by the university that, “We can’t speak to something that allegedly happened a long time ago.”

Hart said what the university can “say is that the values and priorities of our athletic department and football program are aligned, and the constant education of our student-athletes regarding the rules and the consequences of their choices is of the highest priority.”

In response to an email about Foster’s comments, NCAA spokeswoman Emily Potter said that “I can’t speak to a specific situation.”

Generally, the NCAA has a four-year statute of limitations on allegations. But if the NCAA determines there are extenuating circumstances in this case such as a pattern of behavior, it could subject Tennessee to another investigation and potentially more penalties. Tennessee is on probation through Aug. 23, 2015, for previous violations.

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