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Drug-Free Hay Fever Relief

Health HayFever 300x177 Drug Free Hay Fever ReliefBy Ellis Moore

Hay fever sufferers may find some relief with a surprising alternative medicine technique, a new study suggests, though the therapy’s appeal in the “real world” is yet to be seen.

The study, of 422 people with grass and pollen allergies, found that those randomly assigned to a dozen acupuncture sessions fared better than patients who did not receive the procedure.

On average, they reported greater symptom improvements and were able to use less antihistamine medication over eight weeks. The advantage, however, was gone after another eight weeks, according to findings reported in the Feb. 19 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Still, that doesn’t necessarily mean that acupuncture’s benefits fade, said lead researcher Dr. Benno Brinkhaus, of Charite-University Medical Center in Berlin.

Hay fever symptoms were much better in all three study groups by week 16, and Brinkhaus said that’s probably because pollen season was dying down at that point.

The study was well done and “positive,” because acupuncture seemed helpful, said Dr. Harold Nelson, an allergist at National Jewish Health, a Denver hospital that specializes in respiratory diseases.

But Nelson doubted whether the time, inconvenience and expense of acupuncture sessions would seem worthwhile to many hay fever sufferers — especially because there are simpler ways to manage the condition.

“I don’t know how many people will want to wait in an acupuncturist’s office, then sit with 16 needles in them for 20 minutes, and do that 12 times, when they could use a nasal spray,” Nelson said.

Specifically, Nelson pointed to prescription nasal sprays that contain anti-inflammatory corticosteroids. The sprays — which include brand names like Flonase and Nasonex — are taken daily to help prevent hay fever symptoms.

Patients in this study were not using nasal steroids. They were taking antihistamines as needed — which, Nelson said, is not the most effective way to manage hay fever.

Still, Nelson added, there are people who want to avoid medication, and they may be interested in acupuncture as an option.

Many studies have suggested that acupuncture helps ease various types of pain, such as migraines and backaches, as well as treat nausea and vomiting related to surgery or chemotherapy. According to traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture works by stimulating certain points on the skin believed to affect the flow of energy, or “qi” (pronounced “chee”), through the body.

But some recent research suggests that the needle stimulation also triggers the release of pain- and inflammation-fighting chemicals in the body. No one is sure why acupuncture would help with hay fever, but there is evidence that it curbs inflammatory immune-system substances involved in allergic reactions.

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