Big Rainbows in the Political Clouds for Children: Some Really, Really Good news
2/14/2018 11:31:18 AM

By Marian Wright Edelman   God has sent some huge rainbows in the clouds for vulnerable children amidst a profoundly negative political climate. Good news these days has been few and far between but the Bipartisan Budget Package/Continuing Resolution (CR) signed by the President earlier today offers significant and long overdue hope to children, families and communities. We now must give our immediate attention to extending that good news to the nearly 800,000 Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Dreamers and the other Dreamers not yet in DACA, who face a March 5th...

Smart money moves for Black Americans in financial distress
2/7/2018 9:06:01 PM

By Sean Pyles Record-level credit card debt and fluctuating incomes create financial challenges for many American households, especially those with lower incomes. The effects may be felt especially keenly in Black households, where historic and systemic racial discrimination has led to greater disparities in wealth and debt. But there are moves that families facing such hardships can make to better their finances, including improving their credit profile and seeking alternatives to risky products such as payday loans.   DEEPLY ROOTED DISPARITIES IN DEBT AND...

The State of the Union: Morally Dead and Leaving Vulnerable Children Behind
2/7/2018 8:31:11 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman As I listened to President Trump’s State of the Union Address waiting to hear even a kernel of hope for our country’s most vulnerable children I became more and more distressed and disgusted as these children’s needs were once again left behind along with the values of the America and all great faiths that so many of us love and respect. The President’s address was silent on the shameful problems of homelessness, hunger, the lack of poor quality early childhood and educational opportunities, needed reforms in our child welfare and...

Mississippi Honors Man Who Struggled to Integrate University
2/7/2018 8:02:30 PM

By Chevel Johnson The state of Mississippi is recognizing a man who sought to integrate a segregated university until he was falsely imprisoned and denied treatment for the cancer that claimed his life. On Friday, the Mississippi Freedom Trail Task Force dedicated a historic marker acknowledging Forrest County native Clyde Kennard, a black man who repeatedly tried to enroll at the all-white Mississippi Southern College, now the University of Southern Mississippi in Hattiesburg, from 1955 to 1959 as part of an effort to desegregate higher education. It's the trail's 26th...

Please, just let me grow old!
2/7/2018 8:02:28 PM

Dr. James L. Snyder One of the New Year’s resolutions I made, which the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage reminded me, is to take a day off and just relax. That is a rather hard thing for me to do, especially every week. The first week in January, I was busy about my business and my wife said, “Which day this week are you going to take off and relax?” “What do you mean?” I asked. “Remember your New Year’s resolution,” she reminded me, “that you are going to take one day a week off to relax?” I did remember...

Black Republicans Were Big Winners in 2017
1/24/2018 8:58:39 PM

By Raynard Jackson Black Republicans were big winners in 2017 and they don’t even know it. I know it sounds counterintuitive with a polarizing president like Donald Trump in the White House, but Blacks within the party and the Black community in general can benefit from a Trump presidency, if they know how to navigate the Trump world. Yes, there are major structural problems within my party, when it comes to Blacks, but just as problematic is the dearth of Black Republicans who know how to navigate the political terrain and produce something of tangible value to the party and...

Blacks and Politics: Either Get Engaged or Get Left Behind
1/24/2018 8:54:58 PM

By Jeffrey Boney Okay, everyone, if you are reading this, welcome to 2018. You made it, and with that being said, I feel that this is the perfect opportunity for us to be honest about an important truth. First of all, as I see it, it is extremely clear to me, and should be quite evident to anyone who would just simply open up their eyes to see it for themselves, that the Black vote can either make or break an election. If you don’t believe me, I would encourage you to take a look at previous elections where the Black community was actively engaged and driven to get out...

Edgar Ray Killen, convicted of 1964 ‘Mississippi Burning’ killings, dies at 92
1/17/2018 9:58:29 PM

Edgar Ray Killen, a former Ku Klux Klan leader who was convicted in the 1964 'Mississippi Burning' slayings of three civil rights workers, has died in prison at the age of 92, the state's corrections department announced Friday. The one-time Klan leader was serving a 60-year prison sentence for manslaughter when he died at 9 p.m. Thursday night inside the Mississippi State Penitentiary. An autopsy was pending, but no foul play was suspected, the corrections' statement said. His conviction came 41 years to the day after James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew...

The state of America’s children demands your action right now!
1/17/2018 9:43:08 PM

By Marian Wright Edelman It is a national disgrace that children are the poorest Americans. The Children’s Defense Fund’s new report The State of America’s Children® 2017 details the immoral, costly and preventable poverty, homelessness, hunger, health problems, poor education and violence plaguing children who are America’s responsibility and future. The U.S. has 73.6 million children. Nearly 1 in 5 are poor—more than 13.2 million. Children of color, who will be a majority of our children by 2020, are disproportionately poor. About 1 in 3 Black, 1 in...

Never forget why Martin Luther King, Jr. was in Memphis
1/17/2018 9:38:04 PM

By Julianne Malveaux Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. didn't plan to get involved in the Memphis garbage worker's strike. He hadn't planned to be there on the fateful day when he was shot on April 4, 1968. King was pressured to go the first time and found the garbage worker's strike compelling. He promised to return, and felt it important to keep his word, despite a packed schedule. Memphis was so very important, because the 1,300 Black men who worked in the city’s sanitation department were treated despicably. Two workers had been crushed in a garbage compactor in...