Covered California Offers Special Enrollment Opportunity for Those Who Missed Chance for Health Insurance Last Winter
4/19/2018 9:57:48 PM

Covered California’s annual open-enrollment period may be over, but if you are still uninsured, you may be able to get financial assistance to help you purchase the health coverage you need. That was the case for Josefina Meneses of Compton, who lost her insurance when her husband Mario Alberto lost his job—just six months after she was diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer. While open enrollment was over, the Meneses signed up for Covered California during its special-enrollment period in spring of 2017 and kept the coverage needed to treat the tumor on...

Mission Possible: Celebrating Women’s Strength and Persistence
4/19/2018 9:56:04 PM

By Pattie Tucker BSN, MPH, DrPH The National Women’s History Project is celebrating this year’s National Women’s History Month with the theme, Nevertheless, She Persisted. This year’s theme reminds me of countless diverse American women who persisted and made great contributions to our nation’s history. First, there is Graciela Gil Olivarez, who was born during the 1930s and raised in a segregated community in Arizona. As a young adult, Olivarez developed a strong confidence in her abilities to learn. Years later a philanthropist asked Olivarez to...

Former First Lady Barbara Bush in Failing Health
4/19/2018 9:51:07 PM

By Michael Graczyk HOUSTON—Former first lady Barbara Bush is in “failing health” and won't seek additional medical treatment, a Bush family spokesman said Sunday. “Following a recent series of hospitalizations, and after consulting her family and doctors, Mrs. Bush, now age 92, has decided not to seek additional medical treatment and will instead focus on comfort care,” spokesman Jim McGrath said in a news release. McGrath did not elaborate as to the nature of Bush's health problems. She has been treated for decades for Graves' disease,...

Getting Kids to a Good Weight by 13 May Help Avoid Diabetes
4/12/2018 8:29:33 PM

By Marilynn Marchione There may be a critical window for overweight kids to get to a healthy level. Those who shed their extra pounds by age 13 had the same risk of developing diabetes in adulthood as others who had never weighed too much, a large study of Danish men found. Diabetes can develop when the body can't properly use insulin to turn food into energy. Being overweight at any age raises the chances of the most common form, Type 2. But it's not known whether or how much that risk is reduced if people lose weight, and when. “This study seems to suggest that...

Healthcare practitioners need to ensure beneficence, justice and respect for all.
4/12/2018 8:28:23 PM

Study: Blacks and Whites Differ in Their Willingness to Participate in Health Research Studies Racial and ethnic minorities, especially Africa-Americans are significantly less likely to participate in health-related research than whites, says a new study from Ball State University. This impedes the testing, development, implementation, and evaluation of various clinical and community based disease prevention and health promotion interventions, said said Jagdish Khubchandani, a community health education professor in Ball State's College of Health and author of the study...

For Many Black Washingtonians, Gentrification Threatens Housing and Health
4/12/2018 8:25:27 PM

By Barrington M. Salmon This is the first article in a series focused on the health effects associated with gentrification in Washington, D.C. By many measures, the revitalization of neighborhoods across Washington, D.C. has been a windfall for the city. Fueled by higher tax revenues and property values, the city is awash in construction cranes, new libraries, restaurants and retail, and more than 70 miles of bike lanes—all welcomed signs of gentrification in the nation’s capital. Lost in the city’s waves of new amenities and newer, more affluent inhabitants,...

Science Says: What We Know About Cancer Risk and Coffee
4/5/2018 4:15:19 PM

By Marilynn Marchione   Trouble is brewing for coffee lovers in California, where a judge ruled that sellers must post scary warnings about cancer risks. But how frightened should we be of a daily cup of joe? Not very, some scientists and available evidence seem to suggest. Scientific concerns about coffee have eased in recent years, and many studies even suggest it can help health. “At the minimum, coffee is neutral. If anything, there is fairly good evidence of the benefit of coffee on cancer,” said Dr. Edward Giovannucci, a nutrition expert at the...

Stigma in Sickle Cell Disease: How It Impacts ED Care
4/5/2018 4:14:08 PM

By Dr. Kevin Williams   The opioid crisis in the United States is at an all-time high, impacting thousands of Americans every day. What may surprise you is the impact this crisis has on people with medical conditions that cause severe pain, particularly when they receive treatment in the emergency department (ED). In light of the current opioid crisis, ED staff have become much more vigilant in monitoring suspected drug abuse. This can have particular implications for people with sickle cell disease (SCD), whose top reason for visiting the ED is to seek relief from the...

Emergency Department at St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital Now Seeing Patients in New Rapid Care Rooms
3/29/2018 8:36:40 PM

CAMARILLO, CA—St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital (SJPVH), a Dignity Health hospital, is pleased to introduce the newly modernized rapid care rooms as part of its impressive Emergency Department (ED) expansion. Currently, the 14-bed ED sees an average of 24,000 cases a year, with the addition of rapid care rooms, visiting ED patients with less severe emergencies will now receive direct access to prompt care in a relaxed and healing space, further reducing wait times and increasing efficiency. The ED renovation project which began last year has reconfigured the patient...

Barbershop Study Trimmed Black Men's Hair and Blood Pressure
3/22/2018 7:53:29 PM

By Marilynn Marchione   Trim your hair, your beard, your blood pressure? Black men reduced one of their biggest medical risks through a novel project that shows the power of familiar faces and trusted places to improve health. The project had pharmacists work with dozens of Los Angeles barbershops to test and treat clients. The results, reported Monday at a cardiology conference, have doctors planning to expand the project to more cities nationwide. “There's open communication in a barbershop. There's a relationship, a trust,” said Eric Muhammad,...